MENUCLOSE

Opening Hours


Today: 11:30am–5:30pm
Tomorrow: 11:30am–5:30pm

Full opening hours

Location

Royal Hospital Kilmainham
Dublin 8, D08 FW31, Ireland
Phone +353 1 6129900

View Map

Find us by

Standing, Sitting, Swinging, Looking, Listening, Crouching – A different type of architecture exhibition

Wed Dec 4th, 2013

Moving away from the traditional focus on the look and construction of buildings, IAF@IMMA provides a forum for the dissemination and discussion of architecture’s culture, offering critique and support in equal measure, and always with the intention of increasing awareness of and interest in architecture, the meaning of space and the development of the built environment. In a sense IAF@IMMA acts as a visible and opportunistic platform for us to communicate the vital issues and topics that engross the overall ethos of IAF.

Crouching - Advent I-IV - Ciar+ín +ôGaora Photo by Senija Topcic
Crouching – Advent I-IV – Ciar+ín +ôGaora Photo by Senija Topcic

The Everyday Experience is a group show of national and international architects, designers, artists, filmmakers and writers. It reflects on the impact of the built environment and its effect on our lives. The exhibition reveals how much of our experience of designed and informal space is unconscious, immersed in the everyday, but yet it has a significant effect on us individually and as a society. The motive is to take a critical look and discuss the use, perception and production of the built environment.
Listening -These Islands - Gall Photo by Senija Topcic
Listening -These Islands – Gall Photo by Senija Topcic

Without defining the everyday, the exhibition takes you though a series of propositions associated with it and asks questions about the factors and decisions that influence our experience of it. It also conveys how buildings, structures and systems can have a consequence on society and culture.
Looking - Ruta - Cristian Manzutto Photo by Carla Killeen
Looking – Ruta – Cristian Manzutto Photo by Carla Killeen

The exhibition brings into frame current activity in spatial practice and architecture, featuring work from a group of people who use the built environment as the subject matter of their contemporary practice.
They have created a miscellany of approaches and diverse evocations, each independent but connected to reveal the complex relationship between architecture and human experience.
Sitting - Bench for Networking (Dunhuang) - John Gerrard in collaboration with A2 Architects Photo By Sile Stewart
Sitting – Bench for Networking (Dunhuang) – John Gerrard in collaboration with A2 Architects Photo By Sile Stewart

The people in the show were invited to make new interventions, re-appropriate existing work, or revisit old research. They were also encouraged to use the exhibition as a testing ground for prototypes or to experiment with issues relating to the theme. Ultimately, the intention is that all activities engage a diverse audience as much as possible and to create opportunities for convergence, questioning and subversion. The resultant exhibition is a series of planned and creative accidents in both form and content. The experience of the viewer/participant is paramount, the route through the exhibition is not dictated, but there is consideration around the relationships between the pieces, displaying a combination of tension and unease as well as equilibrium and reinforcement. Nothing is finished in this show, each work is on the way to something. The viewer/participant interrupts this trajectory and they become involved, their questions, responses, connections and actions (standing, sitting, swinging, looking, listening, crouching) completes the work.
Standing 02 Play Station - Urban Agency in Colaboration with Gregory Dunn Photo by IAF
Standing 02 Play Station – Urban Agency in Colaboration with Gregory Dunn Photo by IAF

The Everyday Experience shows that the processes involved in creating the built environment can reveal the desires, tastes, priorities and behaviour of a society at any given time. It is a society that can be covert, exclusive, adaptable, creative and interdependent. Also the exhibition tackles the impact of the physical built form, for example, a built structure can enhance an ancient ritualistic landscape or evolve from an indigenous community tradition, it can be the place of memory and association, it can be contested, fictionalised and sentimentalised. The everyday is not in opposition to architecture but reveals its agency, meaning and participation in society.
Swinging Play Station - Urban Agency in Colaboration with Gregory Dunn Photo by Carla Killeen
Swinging Play Station – Urban Agency in Colaboration with Gregory Dunn Photo by Carla Killeen

Nathalie Weadick, Curator
The IAF@IMMA programme is kindly sponsored by The Marker Hotel, Brehon Capital Partners and further supported by the Philanthropy Leverage Initiative of the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht.

Share this


Categories

Up Next

Poet Alice Lyons tells us about her new work something permanent

Wed Nov 27th, 2013
 
[caption id="attachment_158" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Sarah Browne, Remembering Gray, 2013, In collaboration with Alice Lyons and South East Amateur Radio Group (SEARG), Installation shot showing Mark Wall from SEARG transmitting Morse code[/caption] For the duration of the installation of Remembering Gray a project by Sarah Browne currently installed at IMMA, a poem is transmitted via Morse code each Saturday. Transmissions are made by members of the South Eastern Amateur Radio Group, who operate the temporary shortwave radio station EI2EEN from the West Wing Galleries on Saturdays between 12:00 and 16:00. “I wrote the poem called ‘something permanent’ in a visual format that vaguely echoes one of my favourite of Gray’s designs, the Centimeter rug. [caption id="attachment_159" align="aligncenter" width="136"] Brand Name: palazzetti modern classics rugs eileen grayItem#/SKU: centimeter[/caption] The poem is a diptych, meaning that it is in two parts that mirror each other. [caption id="attachment_160" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Alice Lyons, something permanent, 2013[/caption] It comprises three triolets on each side with alternating long lines, mimicking the short and long marks on a ruler. I used the triolet, a French metrical form, since Gray lived for most of ...