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Drawing on the work, friendships and creative circles that inspired artists Nan Goldin, Vivienne Dick and their contemporary pioneers of No Wave, movement born out of downtown New York – Dr Claire Pajaczkowska examines the cultural contexts and feminist politics of New York’s underground scene of 1970s to mid-80’s that became the melting pot for a subculture of avant-garde artists, musician and film-makers to cross pollinate and establish a defining period in the history of film, art, and music.

Dr Claire Pajaczkowska presents this talk from the context of her affiliations with both artists and the renowned Collective and journal, Heresies – A feminist publication on art and politics founded in New York in 1977, aligned with a generation of female No Wave artists, musicians and film makers. Tracing the distinctive styles, attitudes and cultural legacies now defined as No Wave, Pajaczkowska considers the continued influence of No Wave on contemporary visual culture and practice today.

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As an independent filmmaker, Dr Claire Pajaczkowska (co) directed a 16 mm feminist film called Sigmund Freuds’ Dora: A case of mistaken identity in NYC released in 1980 and now Widely distributed by LUX. Pajaczkowska’s works as Senior Research Tutor at Royal College of Art, London. Her research into contemporary cultural studies led to an inclusive range of cultural practices from art to industry. Researching the interface between subjectivity and social structure demands new methods of enquiry. Creative practice as knowledge production is especially interesting and little understood. Her research into fashion thinking explores the subjectivities of neophilia, community, hyper-social attachments, parody, play and insubordination. Born to a Polish and French family, Claire Pajaczkowska was educated in the UK and France. She studied Fine Art at Goldsmiths’ College, University of London (1972) and Contemporary Cultural Studies at Middlesex Polytechnic (1980), before completed her PhD on theories of materialism in the School of Humanities, Middlesex University. Postdoctoral training at the NHS Trust Tavistock Centre, London, developed psychoanalytic experience and theory.