MENUCLOSE

Opening Hours


Today: 11:30am–5:30pm
Tomorrow: 11:30am–5:30pm

Full opening hours

Location

Royal Hospital Kilmainham
Dublin 8, D08 FW31, Ireland
Phone +353 1 6129900

View Map

Find us by

X

Richard Paul Lohse, like his friend Max Bill, was interested in mathematical series and patterns and the discipline that is implied by a geometric non-figurative approach to painting. From 1943 onwards Lohse worked with horizontal and vertical bands of colour, influenced by the formal and chromatic experiments of Piet Mondrian, Theo Van Doesburg and Josef Albers. His aim was to create an anonymous, modular form of art, based on mathematical formulae. His paintings and screen prints combine mathematically precise abstract forms with colours that are similarly derived from formulae. Lohse believed that the ‘creative element in art is restricted to the choice of elements and the formulae of development from them, the rest depending on ingenuity and skill’.*

*’Oxford Companion to 20th Century Art’, Entry for Richard Paul Lohse, 1988.

MediumScreenprint on paper
Dimensions70.3 x 70.1 cm
Credit LineIMMA Collection: Gordon Lambert Trust, 1992
Item NumberIMMA.290 GL
Not on view
Tags
Image Caption
Richard Paul Lohse, Verticles, Screenprint on paper, 70.3 x 70.1 cm, Collection Irish Museum of Modern Art, Gordon Lambert Trust, 1992

For copyright information, please contact the IMMA Collections team: info@imma.ie.

About the Artist

Richard Paul Lohse 1902–1988

Swiss artist Richard Paul Lohse trained in advertising. In 1937 he cofounded Allianz, an association of Swiss artists. Lohse developed a geometric non-figurative approach to painting based on mathematical formulae. From the 1940s he worked with horizontal and vertical bands of colour, influenced by the formal and chromatic experiments of Piet Mondrian, Theo Van Doesburg and Josef Albers. Lohse won numerous prizes. He represented Switzerland at the São Paulo Biennial in 1965 and at the Venice Biennale in 1972. — View Artist »