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Today: 11:30am–5:30pm
Tomorrow: 11:30am–5:30pm

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Location

Royal Hospital Kilmainham
Dublin 8, D08 FW31, Ireland
Phone +353 1 6129900

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Overview

Jessica Lauren Elizabeth Taylor (b. 1984, Florida) is an artist, filmmaker, archivist and community organizer. Her roots are in the Southern United States, born in Mississippi and bred in Florida. Taylor’s work manifests through performance, text, dialogue, dance and community building for Black People and People of Colour. Her work centres on themes of ritual, visibility and identity mythology. She is chiefly concerned with ways to dismantle oppressive institutions and the creation of racial equity in art and theatre. Her advocacy and organizing work stems from contemporary critical race theory.<

Taylor curated and hosted the almost monthly discursive salon on race politics and race relations ‘Black in Berlin’ which was presented at Savvy Contemporary (Berlin) and Kunst-Werke Institute for Contemporary Art. She has performed and presented work at the Barbican Centre of Art (London, UK), Chisenhale Gallery (London, UK), Hebbel Am Ufer (Berlin, Germany), Kunst-Werke Institute for Contemporary Art (Berlin, Germany), Sophiensaele Theater (Berlin, Germany) and The Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art (Oslo, Norway).

 

Residency Profile

Invited

1 – 18 September 2018

Jessica Lauren Elizabeth Taylor was in residence at IMMA as part of a three-week residency and response project entitled Witness. Unfolding across a number of mediums including a film screening, interview, workshop, and salon at IMMA, it  it included public and research and development elements. Key events open to the public include a screening of Muttererde followed by a talk from Taylor, and a salon in the gallery spaces at IMMA.

IMMA programmed Witness in response to the solo exhibition of Andrea Geyer, When We. Taylor’s salon took place within this exhibition space. Taylor’s work echoes and extends many of the themes within Geyer’s practice including feminist and queer theory, activism, identity politics, deconstructing dominant narratives and re-historicizing where there have been misrepresentations of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, race and/or culture. Importantly, within this, Taylor’s work centres and affirms a Black feminist perspective and aims to highlight the direct, explicit and intentional violence that processes of colonization impacts.